POPin Blog

How to Improve Organizational Behavior

Organizations are made up of people, and most people want to belong to successful organizations – especially successful organizations that provide great places to work and real opportunities for future growth. Taken in this context, the best way to improve organizational behavior is to improve the workplace experiences of individual employees. For instance, management can motivate better organizational behaviors by maintaining an appealing workplace environment, setting clear job goals, reinforcing positive outcomes, and recognizing real achievements. Little things can make a big difference for an office, such as maintaining freshly painted walls, clean floors and bathrooms, and providing an inviting common area for meals and conversations. Simple reward systems also offer a convincing way to motivate employees. Some companies recognize their “Employees of the Month” with coveted parking spots, or by displaying photos in the lobby. Other firms give out gift cards to recognize the achievement of project milestones, or even cash bonuses for major wins. Another popular way to appreciate successful employees is by calling them out in quarterly newsletters, interoffice emails, or verbal announcements at company events. Below are several proven methods for improving organizational behaviors. These pointers come from Christine Baker, a management consultant and founding CEO of Requisite Development, writing for Brighthub.com:
  • Clearly define the organization’s goals and communicate the overall vision so that employees understand how their job efforts will contribute directly to the larger group’s overall success.
  • Hold managers accountable for the results of their direct reports. In this way, the organizational culture can ensure that managers assign tasks appropriately and allocate resources sufficiently.
  • Delegate enough authority and autonomy so that people can be effective without repeatedly asking for permission or approval to get their jobs done. Frustration can spill over when employees feel that their bosses don’t trust them enough to make decisions within the scope of their job duties.
  • Build an organization that rewards honesty, encourages fairness in hiring and promotions, and strives to provide transparent communications. Employees will respect managers who remain honest, even when delivering bad news – especially managers who treat all of their subordinates fairly and equally.
  • Create platforms for employee feedback and participation. Everybody has a viewpoint, so it’s important to provide a forum for shared expression. Bosses who think they know it all will soon discover that they don’t know what everyone else is thinking. Those who can shut up and listen to others are likely to learn something new about how to improve organizational behavior.
 

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