POPin Blog

When Bad Days Happen to Good Leaders or How CEOs Get Inspired

“He recently put a photo out of himself in which he’s sitting under a downpour of money…” “Not that every day feels like a million dollars. But if he’s down in the dumps, he takes hold of a sword, stand in front of the mirror and shouts: I have the power!” – October 4, 2015, LA Times
It happens. A lost deal, a missed deadline, an unhappy customer. We trust only rarely, but it happens. And it’s up to you dear C-level leader to help your team rise from the ashes. So, hopefully you’ll leverage some our previous tips on engaging and motivating your teams. But what about those times when YOU need a boost? For those of you who don’t have money reigning from above or a gilded sword to wield when the mood strikes, here are what some top CEOs, Founders and Thought Leaders reveal what inspires them most. Naomi Simson – Founder of RedBalloon “Please Tell Me I Can’t” “I have never thought that people took me seriously. It is as if my need to ‘prove’ myself has fueled my relentless pursuit to create a best work place, for growth and for being “world-famous” for what we do. To show all those people that said to me “you can’t” – that in fact I can.”

Neil Blumenthal – Warby Parker Founder

“Big, Audacious Problems”

“At its root, problem-solving is the act of examining a situation and asking yourself, “How could this be better?” All humans have this instinct. Seeking to learn about particularly pragmatic solutions is the best way I’ve found to get energized and inspired to do the same.”

Peter Greenberg – Travel Editor CBS News “The Lost Art of Conversation” “What gives me inspiration every day is that I know I will meet, encounter or be confronted not by people, but by dozens of fascinating stories. Not everyone is a fascinating storyteller, but every single person has a fascinating story. And that leads to establishing common ground and great business decisions–and even better business deals.”

Phil Libin – Former CEO Evernote

“The key to leading a “100-year startup is to ensure that his employees–currently numbering 265–feel like they’re working for one. No one should be doing something they think is stupid. We want a “militant” focus on making sure everyone understands the impact their work has on the company and, by extension, the world. We have “officer training,” in which employees volunteer to attend meetings in unrelated departments to get a better sense of the big picture.”